How to have a meeting that doesn’t suck

Have a defined end-point for the meeting, and get there as soon as you can.

Take your own notes, by hand, on paper. You’ll notice what’s relevant to you and the act of writing helps you recall it.

Allow audience participation, it’s not a lecture or a class, it’s about collaboration. Someone else knows information that’s relevant and they can’t speak if you never leave space for other people’s words.

Count at least seven seconds of silence when you ask a question. People start squirming at that much dead air and someone will fill it. Some people can tolerate more silence than others, watch for them and ask them questions directly.

If your meeting room is a fridge, people are too busy being cold to pay attention to what you say, and they probably hate you for keeping on talking.

Multiple-hour info-dump meetings will be forgotten by morning. Multiple-hour meetings that are also cold will be remembered only as cold and too long.

Humans need regular bio breaks. Having to ask to be taken to the rest room as an adult, because you require a security badge to get back in and you’re not handing those out to visitors, is humiliating. Don’t be that company. If you can’t get around the badge issue, schedule a break every couple of hours and get people up and moving.

If it’s a meeting where people can phone in, make sure they can hear you over the phone. Repeat questions before answering them, and speak clearly and more loudly than usual.

For a video conference, have a dry run of the technology the day before to make sure everything is working OK. Do not make your meeting the first time you turn the video camera on.

If there’s any way possible you can get everyone in the same room, do that.

Candidates, things your interviewers want you to know

(This is close to my heart because I’ve done a bunch of interviews lately, some good, some not so good.)

If a skill or qualification is on your resume, I will ask you about it, especially if it’s one I also have. Claim to know C# and I’ll ask you C# questions. Claim to know Java and I have a set of Java questions ready to roll. If you say you’re an ISTQB certified tester but don’t know their core testing principles from the syllabus, that’s a problem.

Never lie to me. If you didn’t do your pre-interview essay questions yourself, it will be obvious when I talk to you. I’d rather you said "I don’t know how to do that, but here’s how I might try." Even if you’re on the wrong track, a valiant attempt is far better than a copied answer.

Never ever give me someone else’s answers. Seriously. I can’t believe I have to say this. Things you found on the internet, copied in wholesale, and tried to pass off as your own leave a bad taste in my mouth.

Have some questions to ask me. Because your questions to me are also part of how I assess you. If you ask about the vacation policy, required working hours, and working from home in the interview, those questions worry me.

Don’t have sections copied and pasted from elsewhere on your resume. Why bother telling me the same stuff twice or four times? Don’t waste space and don’t waste my time.

It’s a conversation, not an interrogation. Brainstorm with me, think out loud, if I draw on the whiteboard and hand you a marker, use it. Bad art skills are never a disqualifier for software quality jobs.

Have examples to common questions ready, because I’ll ask you for specifics.

Smile. Even if you’re nervous, fake it if you have to.

Don’t bad-mouth your past or current employers. Even if they’re horrible, find a way to say it that doesn’t involve saying awful things about them. We already know there’s some reason you want to work elsewhere.

You’re interviewing us too, and this job may not be a good fit for you. Better to find that out now than take the job and hate it.

Have a reason for why this job at this company. If you don’t want to be here, I find it odd that you’d go to the trouble of interviewing.

If it’s a phone interview, make sure you answer the phone when I call. If the line is engaged or I end up in voicemail, that doesn’t start the interview off well.

Getting both in to and out of the building are also important. I had one candidate call HR to say the building was locked and she couldn’t get in. It wasn’t locked. Same candidate also walked straight past the elevators and into the kitchen when I said goodbye, and just stood there looking confused for a bit. If you can’t figure out building navigation when you’re nervous, not a good sign.

Evernote

I just got back from a business trip, and I may be slightly addicted to Evernote. Since the client we were visiting issues iPads to new employees, it made sense to take a work iPad with me instead of a bulky, heavy laptop plus power brick, and I’ve been using Evernote to work on some shared work documents.

What makes the iPad indispensable, and turns it from a nice toy into a usable tablet is the Logitech keyboard. While the Samsung Tab Pro 10.1 tablet with Polaris Office has all the functionality of the iPad and then some, the fantastic Logitech keyboard doesn’t yet exist. Logitech says in May the ultra-thin keyboard folio case will arrive, but only for the Tab, not the Tab Pro. The Tab Pro 12.2in size can be bundled with a keyboard case, but is that too big? I’m not sure.

In every meeting, people pulled out an iPad with keyboard and started tapping away. I’d love to do the same with an Android tablet, but sadly I can’t yet.