Books to re-read

There are some books that have earned the status of "books I want to re-read regularly." It’s a short list.

Colin Urquhart "My Dear Child"

This book is by an English author, I found it when I was first dealing with clinical depression, and it is a reassuring read. When I can’t see how God could exist, this book tells me that he does, and he cares.

Chris Baty "No Plot? No Problem!"

I love this book. It’s encouraging and funny and everything I love about National Novel Writing Month in book form.

James Martin, SJ "The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life"

I’m not a Catholic, but this book feels like it was written for me. It is comforting and challenging at the same time, but not condescending or guilt-inducing. A friend at work recommended it and I’m thankful she did.

Todd Henry "The Accidental Creative"

I never thought of my job as a traditionally creative one, but I make my living by thinking and solving problems. I spend a lot of time in my head at work, and this book has lots of practical suggestions for using my mind and my time in better, more productive ways.

Marcus Aurelius "Meditations"

Reading this book feels like I am reading the source material for several other books I’ve read. This translation feels like a collection of sentence fragments in places, but there’s a lot of good advice in here.

Stephen M. R. Covey "The Speed of Trust"

Trust is important to me, I want to be trusted and I want my trust to not be broken by others. This book explains a lot about why trust is important, and how to build trust.

Robert Sutton "The No Asshole Rule"

I’ve loaned my copy out to someone, but this is a fantastic "how not to be an asshole" manual. The comments from readers of this book became Sutton’s "Good Boss, Bad Boss," another good read.